Design Double Take: Sao Paulo

March 25, 2012

A few quick pic's from Sao Paolo that not only turned our heads, but made us say, "Huh?"

Sometime's design is in the details. For example, the sidewalks in the area where we worked were of different materials. The variety was fairly broad and almost always associated with the building architecture and materials. It was particularly noticeable when jogging and the running surface changed every 5-10 meters. Some of the nicest were marble or granite mosaic, and usually received a daily scrubbing with a bucket of soapy water and stiff bristled brush.

Traffic. Oy, the traffic. That explains why Sao Paulo has the highest number of helicopters per capita. I can see daily commuters taking severe umbrage with the congestion while they watch their life drain away in gridlock. In an effort to manage the congestion, there is a rule based on the last number of your license plate that prohibits you from driving during rush hours one day a week.

Traffic. Oy, the traffic. That explains why Sao Paulo has the highest number of helicopters per capita.

The skyline in any direction often features multiple tall thin structures, the actual purpose of which we were not able to understand. It occurred often enough that it seemed to have some sort of purpose to the design. It remains an open ended observation, but I will put forth one possible explanation. Sitting in traffic, jammed between cars and trucks across as many as 8 lanes in one direction, you have only a brief view of the building facades that line the road. It's entirely possible that billboards are simply too wide to be viewed when your car is in traffic, so the tall thin structures may be more effective. Thoughts?